We’re Hiring!

We are seeking several highly motivated full-time Research Technicians.  Please help us find new members for our dynamic team! These research associates will contribute to projects that expand the clinical applications of near-infrared spectroscopy to non-invasively monitor the brain. These openings is available ASAP.

Responsibilities: Job responsibilities will include data acquisition with the NIRS-based device in a clinical setting, study consenting, patient interaction, database management, IRB protocol compliance and record keeping, construction of optical sensors, along with assistance on a variety of other miscellaneous experiments. The candidate is expected to be self-motivated, detail oriented, have strong interpersonal skills, and capable of working in a collaborative environment.

Qualifications: The successful candidate must have a B.S.  The following disciplines are preferred: biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, biology, physics, chemistry, or a related field.  Experience with Matlab, LabView, or other coding language is preferred but not required.  The candidate must be able to lift up to 30lbs and push a large wheeled cart.  The ideal candidate will be willing to commit to at least two years in the position.

Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and CV including the names of 2 references by email to Dr. Erin Buckley (erin.buckley@nullemory.edu) with “Clinical Research Technician” in the subject.

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New paper out on the influence of source-detector separation on brain blood flow

Check out our latest paper in Neurophotonics! Lead author Hongting Zhao explores the influence on the choice of source-detector separation on the accuracy of brain blood flow measured with DCS. It is well known that perfusion in the scalp and skull can significantly influence Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) estimations of brain blood flow. Analytical approaches that model the head as a layered structure aim to minimize these influences. Here we demonstrate that the choice of source-detector separations when using these models is imperative to minimize errors in the estimation of brain blood flow.


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New paper out on the effects of blood transfusion in the brain

Check out our latest paper in Frontiers of Neurology. In this work, we used NIRS and DCS to monitor the effects of blood transfusion on the brain in children with sickle cell disease. The results demonstrate how diffuse optical spectroscopies may be a promising bedside tool for real-time monitoring and for goal-directed therapy aimed at reducing stroke risk in sickle cell disease. Congrats to lead authors Rowan Brothers and Paul Lee!

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